Skip to main content

tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 27, 2019 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

9:00 pm
be colder come in for some it will be colder than the weather we've seen as of late. although a few showers, the main story is there will be nowhere near as much rain as we've seen over recent weeks. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. malta's government is under pressure as the investigation over a murdered journalist widens. there are protests outside parliament as the prime minister's chief of staff is being questioned by police. he's had to resign alongside two government ministers. daphne caruana galitcia was killed in a car bomb attack after writing about corruption. her sister has been speaking to us. the people we are seeing resigning now, should of resigned years ago. the people who are being arrested now should have been arrested years ago too. and definitely, he should go as well, his position is even more untenable now than it was before. on the campaign trail in the uk — labour has produced documents that detail discussions between us and uk trade officials about nhs drug prices.
9:01 pm
we've now got evidence that under borisjohnson, the we've now got evidence that under boris johnson, the nhs we've now got evidence that under borisjohnson, the nhs is on the table, and it will be up for sale. we are absolutely resolved that there will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation, the nhs is not on the table in any way. we'll look into labour's claims and analyse what they mean. also on outside source... welcome once again to the bbc‘s first deregulated from a lead—free, self financing from a fully sponsored tv programme. clive james, writer and broadcaster, famed for his wit and humour, has died. this man keith skembri was the maltese prime minister's chief of staff, yesterday he resigned. this man keith skembri was the maltese prime minister's chief of staff, yesterday he resigned. today he's been questioned by police in relation to the murder
9:02 pm
of the journalist daphne caruana galizia. she was known for investigating corruption in malta, and was killed by a car bomb near her home in 2017. we think the former chief of staff is being questions because of what the the businessman yorgen fenech is saying. he was arrested last week after trying to leave malta onboard his yacht. he's being treated as a suspect. the economy minister chris cardona seen here on the left also resigned from the government on tuesday. as did the tourism minister konrad mizzi. and there have been furious scenes outside parliament. the crowd booed the prime ministerjoseph muscat as he was escorted out of parliament. protesters threw eggs at him. and they want him to resign. here's his side of things. translation: the country needs stability, and my mandate and my actions and decisions in the coming hours and days will be aimed to ensure that stability is maintained,
9:03 pm
and the institutions continue to work serenely. i will also heed the advice of various people who told me not to make statements while an investigation is active. daphne ca ruana galizia's family has also called for the prime minister to resign. my colleague matthew amroliwala spoke to her sister. well, somethings moving, and that's progress, but the rest are long overdue. but the arrests are long overdue. the people we are seeing resign now should of resigned years ago. the people who are being arrested now should of been arrested years ago too. definitely, he should go as well. his position is even more untenable now than it was before. there is a real recognition now amongst the public, in terms of the work your sister was doing, just give me an idea of how much the mood has changed in malta in the last few days? people are angry, i haven't seen anything like this for decades. you know, there is often anger at a political rally, but that goes with the tribalism of our politics.
9:04 pm
what we are seeing now is people being angry about issues, you know, without feel a failure. they don't really care who it is, they are just angry that something like this has happened. and tell me more about your view on the prime minister, because he has been under considerable pressure in recent days with this wave of resignations, opponents calling for his resignation. what is your assessment? you said a moment ago, his position is untenable. his position is untenable more than ever, his position was already untenable before he was killed. — — untenable before daphne was killed. he has been protecting him ever since the panama companies were exposed. that was in 2016. that was a year before he was killed. —— that was a year before daphne was killed. here's mike sanders from the bbc‘s world service. well, they are all accused to varying degrees of corruption, which i have to stress, they all deny. this stems from the panama papers, there is a big cash of 11 million
9:05 pm
documents, i think it was, back in april 2016. this is what daphne was delving into. there are several accusations against skembri, for example, the former chief of staff, one concern is golden passports. now, it was in the gift of the prime minister, joseph's office to give golden passports to rich investors coming from outside the country. many of them russians. the allegation is that skembri in some way was creaming off some of the profits of this, and squirreling them away into a private bank account in panama. this, again, of course, he denies. also, mr mitzie is charged with the same sort of thing, or accused of the same sort of thing. the businessman who left in his yacht, he owned a company called 17 black, which was registered in dubai. it is alleged that that company was a conduit for these illicit payments
9:06 pm
to people like him, and mr mitzie. skembri, and mr mitzie. again, i have to stress these are all allegations, nothing is proven. but given that some of these allegations are now involving people with immense political or economic power in malta, doesn't malta have a sufficiently independent and powerful police service and judiciary to take this on? no, in a word. there was a report back injune by the parliamentary assembly of the council of europe, which is a big european watchdog, and it specifically pinpointed the weakness of the police, and it signalled one of the big disadvantages of the multi—system, which is so much power is concentrated in the office of the prime minister, ofjoseph muscat, and that includes things like a the commissioner of police, pointing to justices, he has control over the banking authority, the financial services authority. of course, malta is very big on financial services. it's about 12% of the economy.
9:07 pm
and the story is getting very close to him. the story is getting very close to him. it has been close to him before, it has to be said. his wife, michelle, was investigated. she allegedly owned a company called egress, which was supposed to be a fund for her personal benefit, again, in panama. but a magistrate was appointed to look into that, and the magistrate cleared her of any wrongdoing. the magistrate was then subsequently promoted to judge by mr muscat, but he says that was a vindication of the distance that his family has kept from this corruption scandal. latest on the uk election campaign. the labour party has obtained a 451—page government document it says shows that the nhs is for sale to american companies. labour argues that the conservatives will open up the nhs to the us after brexit. here'sjeremy corbyn. voters need to ask themselves a very
9:08 pm
serious question. is the nhs safe and boris johnson's hans? serious question. is the nhs safe and borisjohnson‘s hans? we've now got evidence we've now got evidence, that under boris johnson, the nhs is on the table and will be up for sale. the conservatives have strongly denied those claims. this was borisjohnson. we are absolutely resolved, that there will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation. the nhs is not on the table in any way. blue back in no way, the nhs is on i'io blue back in no way, the nhs is on no weight on the table in any aspect, whatsoever. so what is actually in this document? discussion of the national health service does appear. it's mostly us officials pushing for american drug companies to have greater access to the uk market. what does that add up to? here's chris morris from reality check. so, the official negotiating objectives of the us trade representative for a future us—uk trade deal or published earlier this year. they include the desire to reduce or eliminate all barriers to us investment in all sectors in the uk. they call explicitly for full market access for us
9:09 pm
pharmaceutical products. so it's hardly surprising that this was one of the issues raised this series of preparatory talks. between relatively junior american and british trade officials. not least because us pharmaceutical companies tend to lobby their government very aggressively. figures compiled in washington suggest that last year, pharma spent more on lobbying than any other industry. now, these american and british officials, they discussed drugs pricing, including the idea that patents for example could be extended to stop cheaper generic drugs being used for a longer period. so now we know what the americans want. but do these documents tell us anything about what the conservative party wants. here's more from chris morris. but, and it is a big but, these are preliminary talks to prepare for possible negotiations, and the uk doesn't have to agree to any of the american demands. of course, there's going to be pressure. that's what trade talks are all about. there will also be trade—offs.
9:10 pm
if the uk turns down some of these american requests, then we can expect the americans to reject some key british demands for access to their markets. but none of this is really proof that the nhs is somehow for sale, even if the us would like it to be on the table. what it does show, i think, is just how difficult and how time—consuming any post brexit trade negotiations are going to be. health secretary matt hancock... it's certainly true that the issue of anti—semitism isn't going away. just to recap — yesterday the uk's chief rabbi wrote a column accusing the labour leadership of failing to tackle anti—semitism in the party. saying on election day the "soul of the nation is at stake". this issue then came up when the bbc‘s andrew neil interviewed jeremy corbyn.
9:11 pm
so no apology? any other form of life... let's try one more time. john mccain on minute, andrew, can i explain what we are trained to do? you have, and you've been given ple nty of you have, and you've been given plenty of time. andrew... so no apology. the shadow home secretary diane abbott. neck though he wouldn't say sorry and that interview at any stage. we have also heard the word sorry from the labour shadow chancellor. we have already said it, and i will repeat it again, i'm really sorry, the way we handled it initially, because we have learned lessons from that. nick eardley is in westminster. nick, it feels like there's a
9:12 pm
titanic battle between the parties over which issues dominated? yes, i think that's absolutely right. boris johnson went into this general election wanting to persuade everybody that the decision they had to make was which party they thought would deal with brexit more efficiently and quicker. he talks about it every day. i have lost count of the amount of times i've heard borisjohnson say count of the amount of times i've heard boris johnson say the count of the amount of times i've heard borisjohnson say the words get brexit done since this campaign began. at the same time, labour is absolutely adamant that we should be talking about public services. the one they want to talk about most, the one they think tories are vulnerable on is the nhs. that's exactly why mr corbyn raised this press c0 nfe re nce exactly why mr corbyn raised this press conference today, where you saw him brandishing about the a50 page document, talking about those talks with the us. what do they show us? not quite that the conservative government is ready to sell parts of the nhs, or ready to allow the us to
9:13 pm
hike up drug prices. quite the opposite. it doesn't show that the government has agreed to that in any way. it does show that the united states wa nts way. it does show that the united states wants it though. and i think for states wants it though. and i think foer states wants it though. and i think for mr corbyn, it's our way of saying it to those he's hoping to attract support from, well, look at, do you think this could come up ain? do you think this could come up again? and do you trust the other party to say no? help me understand the labour strategy and brexit a little bit more. becausejeremy corbyn has repeatedly said boris johnson's propose a deal with the eu isa johnson's propose a deal with the eu is a disaster for the johnson's propose a deal with the eu is a disasterfor the uk. so what johnson's propose a deal with the eu is a disaster for the uk. so what is the labour strategy about not wanting to talk about it very much? well, look, they try to get this out of the way, some would argue u nsuccessfully, of the way, some would argue unsuccessfully, by saying our plan is to have renegotiation within three months if we win power, then another referendum on that versus remain within six months. i think the problem jeremy corbyn has —— consistently how does this idea that he doesn't know what he wants to
9:14 pm
happen, that he's not made his mind up. we have heard him say that he wa nts to up. we have heard him say that he wants to stay neutral in this campaign, again, roz, iwould suggest that that was an attempt to try and draw a line under the issue, but, again, i have watched about 30 borisjohnson but, again, i have watched about 30 boris johnson stump but, again, i have watched about 30 borisjohnson stump speeches over the last three weeks or so, and in each of them, he brings up the steam point, because he thinks it works. he says —— to those people how can you elect a pre—minister that hasn't told you what he wants to happen on the big issue of the day? now, the truth is, we cannot be completely sure if that is having a significant impact or labour support, but the tory calculation, and calculation from her supporting parties like the lib dems and the s&p as well is that if they keep hammering the message, that corbyn is indecisive on this, it will cost the labour party votes. -- s&p. we it will cost the labour party votes. —— s&p. we met thank you very much indeed, of course, much more information on the uk election
9:15 pm
campaign including the policies of all the parties. on the bbc website. early on, some very sad news. the australian writer and broadcaster clive james has died at the age of 80. he'd lived in britain for nearly 60 years, became very well known for his wry commentary on funny clips from international tv — though his work had a far, far greater range that. he was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2010. and has spoken openly about his fight against cancer ever since. david silla to looks back on his life. # hello, clive...# welcome once again to the bbc‘s first deregulated, lead—free, self—financing, fully—sponsored tv programme. for your protection, the entire show has been pre—boiled for one minute. clive james, the tv critic who became a tv star talking about tv. if you're to see a welsh soap opera, then you must catch the bbc‘s pobol y cwm. the action in pobol y cwm is nonstop.
9:16 pm
british broadcasting corps, night training, sunday... but there was so much to him. he was a comic performer, a journalist, essayist, poet and a lyricist. i would classify me as a writer, because everything i do is based on writing, even when i'm improvising on tv, like now, i'm writing it in my head just before i say it. if it's any good at all! and that's what i do. his tv shows jumped between prime—time entertainment... —— the giant toad having joined the water—dwelling worms aboard the plastic pants, coffin number three is uncovered. in the ‘80s, we laughed with him at shows that british television would then go on to copy. in our time, fame is everywhere — you can't get away from it... by the end of the ‘90s, his tv career was coming to an end, but the words kept flowing. he rekindled his songwriting partnership with pete atkin. # touch has a memory... and then he was diagnosed with leukaemia. in 2010, and again a year later, he thought he was about to die. he was saved by a new drug.
9:17 pm
i was in serious medical trouble, and i got saved, and so this is spare time. and it's very important to me, because i wasn't expecting to have it, and it'sjust good manners to try and use it well. he could write about anything — from commentaries on proust to an appreciation of eddie waring to this, his words on facing the end, hoping that he would live long enough to see the leaves emerge on a newly planted maple tree. filling the double doors to bathe my eyes, a final flood of colours will live on. as my mind dies, burned by my vision of a world that shone so brightly at the last, and then was gone. you can read some of the tribute on the bbc news website. and if human
9:18 pm
it's an outside source, we are going to be learning about new research that's found 99% of dolphins are, are you ready for this? right handed. i'm not sure if that's the technical phrase, but you know what imean, we technical phrase, but you know what i mean, we will explain the significance of this in a moment. the uk is set to give more money to the european space agency. it's hoped than an increase in the current annual payment of £305 million will safeguard britain's role in the international space programme. our science correspondentjonathan amos is at the european space agency ministerial meeting in seville, with the latest. america spends far, far more money across the board, if you take the russians, they spend a little bit less then the europeans on their civil space programme, and the chinese, they are the other big player out there, they are spending kind of approach what nasa is spending, civilly, but they have a military programme as well, and
9:19 pm
here, they have a menu of things the member states can spend the cash on, they are kind of bidding against each other on different projects. you know, they all have their own pet project, and maybe they have not got enough of that pet project to proceed, so they put some money into somebody else's coming to get money back that way. then, at the end of tomorrow, we will have a full list. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? malta's government is under pressure as the prime minister's chief of staff is being questioned by police and ministers have resigned over the killing of a journalist. here is the main straight from bbc world service. a nineteen—year—old volunteer firefighter in australia, has been accused of arson. it's alleged that he started seven fires in the state
9:20 pm
of new south wales before joining efforts to tackle the fire. fire chiefs called it the ‘ultimate betrayal‘. cows at a farm in russia are being given virtual reality headsets to reduce their anxiety levels. the headsets show a "unique summer field simulation "programme", we're told. according to moscow's ministry of agriculture and food, the cow is calmer and produces more milk — but that could be fake moos. next they might think of actually putting the cows in a field. now to bangladesh, seven men have been sentenced to death in bangladesh for their part in the deadliest terrorist attack in the country's history. the target was a cafe in the capital dhaka three years ago. 22 people died — most were foreigners. all of the gunmen were killed — but today, members of an islamist group that organised the attack were sentenced. jill mcgivering has more. at the time, there had been a series of targeted attacks, apparently carried out by islamists against people like secular bloggers and
9:21 pm
writers, left wing liberals, and also people from religious minorities. that was causing a lot of concern in bangladesh. people were starting to criticise the authorities saying, why is this going on? why are you on top of this direct? then we have this cafe attack, which was devastating for him and caused a lot of shark. so a big amount of pressure on the government at the time, you need to be doing something about this, why didn't you prevent to? what will you do now? that led to? what will you do now? that led to quite a widespread crackdown by the security forces, all ordered by the security forces, all ordered by the government, again suspected islamic militants across the country, so they would hide out that where disrupted, shoot outs, the official figures where disrupted, shoot outs, the officialfigures are where disrupted, shoot outs, the official figures are that about 100 people were killed in it though series of operations. many hundreds arrested. some critics of the government started to say it, of course we recognise the threats, we wa nt to course we recognise the threats, we want to get on top of it, but this is too hard in terms of the tactic. it's too heavy—handed. there was also a broader question that has lingered on well, who exactly what these people? we know in court today that one of them come again, said
9:22 pm
that one of them come again, said that i have allegiance to the islamic state group that they actual attackers had said in videos at the time. the government has always denied they had any links. they a lwa ys denied they had any links. they always say this is a home—grown issue, and it's a home—grown solution. but we are left a little unsure, were they inspired? with a reading online material? were they doing it in the name of islamic state ? doing it in the name of islamic state? or were there any links, any training, and he supports in financial terms? those questions we still don't really know the answers to. manchester city are at the centre of a record breaking deal. the compa ny‘s owner, city football group is selling a 10% stake to us private equity firm silver lake for $500 million. the deal values city football group at $a.8 billion — the highest ever sports valuation. here's one analyst. just to put it into some part of context, we have been valuing and evaluating the top football clubs for the last 1a years. in q1 this year, we put a value of real madrid
9:23 pm
as the most valuable football enterprise at 3.6 billion sterling. this equates to 3.7 billion. so it's overta ken this equates to 3.7 billion. so it's overtaken the most valuable football club. so this will have ramifications across the industry. another way of putting that into context, this implies a seven times revenue multiple. we typically see the most viable for book club sorta valued at 5.5 to six times revenue multiple, so there is a significant premium attempt to enact —— attached to this. and city for book group, and for the people group, not only in manchester city, but they have a portfolio of clubs around the world, including new york. there is talk of stadium developing over there, which will enhance the brand into tapping into the us consumer market. but more significantly, they will be looking at technology. now, silver la ke looking at technology. now, silver lake have a strong portfolio of technology investments, they will be looking to utilise and leverage that expertise and those investments. now, report on a startup company
9:24 pm
that connects the worlds biggest brands to social media influencers, this is timothy yarmo, the founder and boss of a website called fan bites. he has been talking to the bbc. you will never be ready, and this is one of the big things that i have come to realise running a business. you will never be ready to become a ceo. you will never be ready to take that leap. you will never be ready to do anything, you have to force yourself into doing that. he has been talking to the bbc. you will never be ready, this is one of the big things that i have come to realise running a business. you will never be ready to become a ceo. you will never be ready to take that leap. you will never be ready to do anything, you have to force yourself into doing that. personally, there was never a time where i felt ready to lead a business with 30 plus people at 2a. there was never a time when i thought i could go to investors and raise over a million for my business. we are never ready for my business. we are never ready for it, but what i did was i forced
9:25 pm
myself to really become that leap. you will never be ready to do anything, you have to force yourself into doing that. personally, there was never a time where i felt ready to lead a business with 30 plus people at 2a. there was never a time when i thought i could go to investors and raise over a million for my business. we are never ready for my business. we are never ready for it, but what i did was i forced myself to really become that person by learning how other people who had gone through what i was trying to achieve, how they had got it, and just ruthlessly come and almost taking emotion out of it, just attacking that. the key to this is thinking about it, almost like a scientific process. treat it as a very logical thing. if a was able to get b, then technically, if i do what a has done, then i will be able to get be. i think this dates back from my love of math and computer science, having done computer science, having done computer science at university, and also my first business starting by tutoring people map, i think that appreciation and logic has really helped me and also being able to grow the business. and the second half of the programme, we will hear what nicholas turgeon has been sent. they have launched this election ma nifesto, have launched this election manifesto, and saying they want a referendum on scottish independence next year. we will find of the arguments behind that in a couple of minutes' time.
9:26 pm
good evening. for this look at the world weather, i'd like to start with the united states. we've got two storms with us for the run up to thanksgiving. this was denver, near denver, colorado during the course of tuesday. they've had phenomenal amounts of snow so early in the season. so, very good news to some of the ski resorts, but it's causing quite a lot of disruption travel wise, as you can imagine, heading into thanksgiving. that low pressure has been steaming its way across the midwest and the great lakes through wednesday. heavy snowfall here, and strong winds giving white out conditions. an even deeper area of low pressure has been moving in off the pacific northwest. hurricane force winds for a time, heavy snow, and tropical moisture coming up to meet it means more soaking rains, flash flooding potential across the desert southwest, and more heavy snow for the cascades and into the sierra nevadas, because it's really cold canadian arctic air heading quite far south.
9:27 pm
so, we've got further issues to come, i think, during the course of thursday into friday, as that next very deep area of low pressure, wintry storm, heads its way northwards and eastwards, further significant snow, and rain in places to come. keeping it a little bit milder in san francisco with that influence off the pacific, but you can see it's chilly for a time in dallas, certainly so in minneapolis, still some warmth and sunshine though in miami. some of that heavy rain will affect parts of mexico as well, and then it's looking particularly wet through colombia, panama, right the way down to southern parts of brazil. unfortunately, here, we could see some flash flooding and we've seen more than our fair share of the rains, the rainy season across the east of africa, we are watching more development across the arabian sea for the horn of africa. but as well is that, we have parts of kenya, tanzania tanzania, malawi, angola, at risk from some very wet weather, possibly parts of madagascar as well in the coming few days. so, a part of the world we are keeping a close eye on, weather—wise. this is a developing typhoon, and that's potentially
9:28 pm
going to head its way towards the philippines towards the weekend. that could give an awful lot of rain as well. then, of course, we've got some really big downpours across greece and turkey during the day on tuesday. we've had low pressure rattling its way in across the northwest of europe during wednesday, that continues its progress into scandinavia on thursday. things are getting a bit milder, temporarily, but, then, behind it, a strong northerly wind. so, some coastal flooding potentially, as you can see, it's heading its way southwards toward southern france and the alps. again, more rain for the balkans. that really cold air though plunges southwards then, as i say, with that strong northerly onto the north sea coast. there could be some coastal flooding as well, but there is that dip in temperature for london, for paris, for madrid. still the chance of some showers around in rome as well. here in the uk, still more wet weather to come in the next day or two, but it should dry up for many for a few days, there will be that cold northerly wind. there will be more uk
9:29 pm
weather in half an hour.
9:30 pm
hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. malta's government is under pressure, as the investigation widens, over the murdered journalist daphne ca ruana galizia. there are protests outside parliament as the prime minister's chief of staff is being questioned by police. he's had to resign alongside two government ministers. daphne caruana galitcia was killed in a car bomb attack after writing about corruption. her sister has been speaking to us. people we are seeing resigning now should have resigned years ago. people are being arrested now that should've been arrested years ago, as well. his position is even more untenable now than it was before. on the campaign trail in the uk, labour has produced documents that detail discussions between us and uk trade officials about nhs drug prices.
9:31 pm
we've now got evidence that under borisjohnson, the we've now got evidence that under boris johnson, the nhs we've now got evidence that under borisjohnson, the nhs is on the table and will be up for sale. we are absolutely resolved that there will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation. the nhs is not on the table in any way. welcome once again to the bbc‘s first fully responsible tv programme. clive james, writer and broadcaster, famed for his wit and humour, has died. let's get more on our top story, the increasing pressure on the government in malta as the investigation widens into the murder of the journalist daphne ca ruana galizia. she was killed back in 2017. she was known for investigating
9:32 pm
corruption in malta, and was killed by a car bomb near her home in 2017. this man, keith schembri, was the maltese prime minister's chief of staff — he resigned yesterday, and he's now been questioned by police in relation to the murder. two ministers have also resigned, and people are protesting outside parliament calling on the prime minister to step down. pauline ades—mevel is from reporters without borders. thank you very much indeed for joining us today. what have you made of the escalation of the story in the last couple of days? well, it's been a very hectic day yesterday, and we've seen some new developments today. anything can happen in malta now. i think we are also seeing steps for the past seven days, and are hoping a lot that in the next development in the next coming days
9:33 pm
— three ministers close to the prime minister have stepped down yesterday, and then some pressure on the prime minister to step down, as well. so it is hard to know what will happen next, but for sure, there is improvement and we are hoping a lot for the next coming days. do you have faith in the process ? days. do you have faith in the process? yes, we do. i think we've been waiting for two years to see what is happening now. it is not — we wa nt what is happening now. it is not — we want the mastermind it to be prosecuted. so far, we've seen some moves and steps forward, but it is not enough. but definitely, after two years where nothing has happened, after calls for some acknowledgement from the government, and for some change— also some change for press freedom on the island, something is definitely happening now. so we need to see what is coming next. but this is
9:34 pm
definitely a new step forward. but is also true that malta, a relatively small country, is being exposed to outside that are perhaps too big for her to control? pressure from outside — we believe there has not been much pressure on the government from the eu so far. pressure from outside — for sure, the fact that nothing has changed, compared to slovakia, where the promised or step down and there was some big move after the deaths five months after the assassination. nothing has changed in malta. the same people have kept their positions over there, and nothing changed, and there were demands from the ngos, from the family, and also from the conciliar area of europe,
9:35 pm
and nothing changed. we've seen recently the fact that the independent public inquiry will take place, and we hope to see whether this murder could have been avoided. and of course, the news tape with this arrest and this minister stepping down —— new step. this arrest and this minister stepping down -- new step. pauline, thank you very much. pauline is from reporters without borders. the scottish national party launched its manifesto today. it only stands for election in seats in scotland, but how it fares impacts uk politics. this was the make—up of parliament before it was dissolved last month. the snp had the third most seats after labour and the conservatives, and it wants more. here's its leader, nicola sturgeon.
9:36 pm
every single one of the 13 conservative—held seats in scotland right now has the snp as their main challenger. so my message to scotland is, "let's go in a way that deprives borisjohnson of a majority, and locks him out of office." nicola sturgeon says she's willing to support labour in the event of a hung parliament — but she says she'll want as much as possible of the snp manifesto to be adopted. we will have to see if that comes to pass, a few things need to occur before it is even a decision that will be taken. this is its headline policy... scotland has already had one previously, in 201a. scotla nd scotland rejected it. labour has ruled out holding a new vote as soon as 2020, and borisjohnson has vowed there will never be another one while he's prime minister. the snp also wants a second referendum on leaving the eu, but says the independence vote should happen whatever
9:37 pm
happens with brexit. here's nicola sturgeon again. people in scotland don't want to leave the eu. increasing numbers of people in scotland won independence. so you know, democracy is the way to determine the kind of country you want to be in. here's a tweet from the conservative party's official account... the ruth being referred to there is the outgoing conservative leader in scotland, ruth davidson. the conservatives think that attack line is a winner. here's our scotland correspondent, james shaw. a lot of the snp calculation centres around the possibility — at least the possibility that labour might be in the position to form a minority government, and jeremy corbyn has made it clear that they are not — they haven't closed off the idea of having a second independence referendum, albeit they say it will not be a priority for them, it won't happen in the first few years if there was a minority labour government.
9:38 pm
but he hasn't closed off the idea. so i think the fact that the snp say they wouldn't do anything to help the conservatives get into downing street, but they would be willing to help reach some sort of an agreement with labour and jeremy corbyn — that tells you really that they have committed, in terms of any postelection arrangement — they have committed to talking to labour, but not talking to the conservatives. why make extensive coverage on the election campaign on the bbc news website. now to zimbabwe — senior doctors say the country's hospitals are "death tra ps" with unusable drugs and equipment. they've accused the government of carrying out a "silent genocide", adding... senior doctors have joined junior colleagues who have been on strike for almost three months.
9:39 pm
already, more than a00 junior doctors have been sacked, after they defied a court ruled that the strike was illegal. the bbc‘s shingai nyoka is in harare. the consultants and specialists have been covering for striking junior doctors for several months, providing emergency services. but they say that the situation continues to deteriorate, that there is a shortage of bandages andsyringes, and that the equipment is substandard, and that it is no longer safe to continue treating patients. they want the junior doctors reinstated. now thejunior doctors have been on strike for several months now. they want their salaries to be paid in us dollars as a cushion against the soaring inflation of over a00%. the latest action worsened the situation that was already bad, and at one of the major hospitals, i met a young woman who had been severely assaulted by her husband.
9:40 pm
—— young pregnant woman. she said she had gone from one public hospital to another, trying to get medical assistance. i met another family that was there to collect the body of a loved one. they say that they've lost four family members in the space of the strike. now the government, backed by a labour court ruling, continues to fire these striking doctors, and says that it will recruit some more from other organisations and outside the country. this crisis has been described as a "silent genocide", but it is a genocide that neither side wants to take the blame for. a series of huge storms are causing havoc on both coasts of the us ahead of the thanksgiving holiday. the us national weather service says the scale of this storm could be "unprecedented". and here's the view from colorado, where there has already been a heavy snow fall — record amounts in some places. travel conditions
9:41 pm
have been hazardous. hundreds of flights around the country have also been cancelled. in new york, jenna deangelis from cbs... laura trevelyan has more. "will olaf fly tomorrow?" that's the burning question here in new york city — never mind the impeachment inquiry into donald trump. will the giant inflatables, which are a feature of the things thanksgiving day parade, be allowed off the ground? or will that storm system coming in from the midwest ground them? now here's why it's important, because actually back in 1997, felix the cat, one of the big balloons, injured four people when it banged into a street lamp. so there are very, very strict rules governing whether or not the balloons can fly. if winds are above 23 mph and if they are gusting above 3a mph, the balloons are grounded.
9:42 pm
now that is the decision that will be made by parade officials early thursday morning when they look at the forecast. then we will know whether the nutcracker will be allowed to leave the ground and fly, or if he's going to be dragged along the ground — which is what will happen if they can't fly. fingers crossed, we keep dutch are keeping an eye out of that one. nine out of ten humans on the planet are right—handed. studies of various animals species have shown they also prefer one side, over another. researchers in the bahamas have found evidence ofjust how strong this bias can be. this is a bottlenose dolphin that is turning left on the ocean floor. scientists found 99% of the time this happens — as they put their right side towards the ocean floor to echo—locate food. beth timmins has more.
9:43 pm
you make is the same as with us. you're either right or that's because there is one side of the brain controlling that side of the body. so with fish, right flipper this is the same as right handedness. of the dolphin shows nutmeg that is how we can tell. now why is it that we can see many dolphins going that way than the other way. that's it, the finding was quite remarkable, because with 705 out of 709, that is 99% of the turns were that way. the reason for thatis turns were that way. the reason for that is evolutionarily, the researchers theorized it helps you with feeding and forging if you are repeating the movement on one side, because didn't you can do it quicker and faster, and more easily. just like we do with repeated tasks. so
9:44 pm
thatis like we do with repeated tasks. so that is us and dolphins. anyone else? us and dolphins, and actually shellfish showed a high degree of lateralization, which is this prevalence in the brain. and shellfish, when they are fishing, it has actually helped them in comparison to other fish to get more fish, having this high degree of lateralization. also, chimpanzees and gorillas are right—handed predominantly. but opposite to that, orangutans are actually more left—handed, so 66% of orangutans are more left—handed. left—handed, so 66% of orangutans are more left-handed. and i want to understand why is it that chimpanzees, dolphins and humans all come out favouring the right? do we understand why the right is favoured more than the left? we aren't sure at the moment. i spoke to a marine biologist, doctorjames at the moment. i spoke to a marine biologist, doctor james herbert at the moment. i spoke to a marine biologist, doctorjames herbert reid at the university of cambridge, who told me that this is an evolutionary animal science because we are not
9:45 pm
wholly sure why the right has taken a predominate over the left. and there's a lot more cognition studies that need to be done to pin that down. but it does seem to be that the right—handed side is more prevalent. even with babies in the womb, nine out of ten human babies have shown to be sucking their right hand thumb rather than left hand thumb. so it is that early on that this lateralization develops. there's a word i've never used before, lateralization. let's see if we can drop that in a conversation over the next few days. in a few minutes, we'll return to the sad news we heard earlier. the australian writer, broadcaster and critic clive james, has died at the age of 80. he was one of the most familiar faces on british tv for many years. we'll have more tributes.
9:46 pm
nearly 100 heads of council social care services for adults in england say they fear they won't be able to cope with demand this winter. two—thirds of social care directors responded to a survey from the organisation that represents them, with 93% adding they're concerned that if a care company fails in their area, they won't have the capacity to step in. our social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. have you got my water bottle there? thank you. nina is 47 and has multiple sclerosis. she knows all too well the pressures on the care system in england that are reflected in today's survey. she has onlyjust moved into the specially adapted flat where she gets the help she needs. thanks, tracy. but in the summer, she was living in a small room ina summer, she was living in a small room in a nursing home for elderly people. she spent ten months they are because there was nowhere else for her to go. the person i should
9:47 pm
be in this bed is an elderly person with alzheimer's or dementia. and i should be out in the community, living in independent and much more normal life. now trying to live that more independent life, she's using her pension and money from selling her old flat to pay for the care she needs. it will run out within weeks, and nina worries her council won't be able to provide her with enough support. demand from an ageing population, staff shortages and financial difficulties for councils lie behind the problems. i think this is a result of continued short—term action, so rolling over of money or little bits of money for winter or here and there, and i think the cumulative effect of that over a—5 years has led to this. those worries are about a care crisis in england, but many of the pressures are felt across the uk, and for nina the need to fix the problems facing her and many others is now urgent. alison holt, bbc news.
9:48 pm
this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story... malta's government is under pressure as the prime minister's chief of staff is being questioned by police and ministers have resigned over the killing of a journalist. here are some of the main stories from bbc world service. the bodies of 16 of the 39 people found dead in a lorry trailer in britain last month, have been returned to their families in vietnam. they include the body of 18—year—old who left for france two years ago after his mother borrowed money to help him travel. a 19—year—old volunteer firefighter in australia, has been accused of arson. it's alleged that he started seven fires in the state of new south wales before joining efforts to tackle the fire. fire chiefs called it the "ultimate betrayal". cows at a farm in russia are being given virtual reality headsets to reduce their anxiety levels.
9:49 pm
the headsets show a "unique summer field simulation program", we're told. according to moscow's ministry of agriculture and food, the cow is calmer and produces more milk. back to the uk election and the battle online. volunteer activists on facebook are creating pages to promote their agenda. brexit is a dominant theme. here's a list of the top pro—remain facebook pages — the "best for britain" page has eight. ——8 —— 8 million likes and shares. also get britain out, which also has 8.5 million likes, shares and comments. bbc trending's marianna spring has more on this side of the campaign. these are facebook pages, meaning they are different groups, and not
9:50 pm
so much a discussion forum as a page thatis so much a discussion forum as a page that is run by one person, and they are the only person that can post content. then people who follow the page can comment on those posts, whether they be memes or links, or all kinds of images — everything you would expect in a facebook group. it isa would expect in a facebook group. it is a different kind of forum, almost functioning like a news outlet or broadcaster insomuch as you put things out and people are able to directly comment on them. these news pages or facebook pages that we've been looking at are essentially highly partisan pages, usually focus on brexiteers, for or against it, or focused on the left and jeremy corbyn, or even sometimes just funny mean pages. and all of them in some way endeavour to share political content that they feel it represents or reflects the opinions of a group of people that the mainstream media are failing in some way. by that list we just looked at, some of them are connected to big established campaign organisations — some are
9:51 pm
presumably being run out of a bedroom. as a mixer or do we see the big speech is being run by serious established organisations?m big speech is being run by serious established organisations? it is definitely a scale. you have these big pages that are really professional operations, and they are being run almost in the same way as political party campaigns. then you have the facebook pages that we spoke to and those admins who are running things from their sitting room and north yorkshire or sitting in their bath in hertfordshire. these are not professional operations, but often 1— to people who have just decided they want to set upa who have just decided they want to set up a facebook page and share content. let's take a look at some of the memes being shared. this one is from the page "stop brexit limited" — it urges its followers to vote tactially to remove the conservative party from power. they are very keen on borisjohnson not staying in number ten. this one has been shared on the pro—brexit page. "we're more than a star on someone else's flag" — it's makes fun of what the labour
9:52 pm
party is offering. here's marianna spring again. with memes it is much easier to make memes than it used to be. so quite a few of them produce their own content, but they also like to take content, but they also like to take content from other pages. the pro remained pages, we know there is a network of them, so they share content between them and repost it in the groups we've spoken about before to get more traction and interest in their pages. internet metrics like clicks and likes always generate huge numbers, but sometimes those big numbers don't necessarily fairly represent the impact or popularity of a page. how can we accurately assess the impact these pages are having on the way people are feeling about politics in the uk? it is very difficult to do that. the metrics of posts, like the number of likes and comments and shares, which all of these pages are
9:53 pm
cumulatively in the million, don't show how many people they reach. often times their screenshot and shared in groups. one admins says she deliberately does not put many captions on her memes so they can easily be repaired. it is also important to point out that those who share these will already be part ofa who share these will already be part of a set of opinions. how much this changes them will be debatable. but at the same point, a pro brexit group decides that it will back the conservatives and says to vote for borisjohnson conservatives and says to vote for boris johnson rather than nigel farage, it actually change someone public opinion. the australian writer and broadcaster clive james has died at the age of 80. his many, many fans loved him for — among other things — presenting brilliant programmes on television, about television. impressionist rory bremner tweets...
9:54 pm
comedian and writer david baddiel tweets... of course we can all relate to that feeling. his range was wider than just tv — he wrote books, poetry, and journalism. no subject was too big or too small. let's close the programme today with a clip of clive james in his prime, talking about body—building magazines. from the early 50s, the scene expanded dramatically. and the men and expanded with it. of her arms like shopping bags full of crushed walnuts. want big deltoids runs the copy on this display page from the 1953 number? then try the alternate dumbbells press. alternate dumbbells we re dumbbells press. alternate dumbbells were never in short supply. could you imaginea were never in short supply. could you imagine a mightier trust than this, ask a copy under this photo?
9:55 pm
the answer has to be not when sober. he doesn't look any less money from the side. he looks like he's just swallowed a lincoln continental after chewing it six times. what's all for? why do they do a? in this photo of another wider champion, mr america, the answer is staring you right in the face. can you spot it? yes. unless they build the muscles, they'd never be able to pick up the trophy. were going to miss clive james, who is died at the age of 80. see you tomorrow. hello there. we have some big changes in our weather pattern over the next few days, as we will see in a moment. before we get there, thursday's weather dominated by this area of low pressure, that again is going to be bringing outbreaks of rain.
9:56 pm
through the day, to allow cold and northerly winds to arrive across the northern half of the country, and with that, we will see a change to drier weather conditions. now, thursday, it's a wet start to the day in a number of places. some fairly heavy bursts of rain still around for northern ireland, northern england, north wales, and slipping southwards into the midlands and east anglia through the day. southern england, quite cloudy, an odd patch of rain possible, but it's here where we will see some of the high temperatures, 10—11 degrees. whereas further north, as the sunshine comes out, in scotland and northern england, the temperatures will drop through the day. temperatures only around six degrees in edinburgh come the afternoon. and a sharp frost will develop, as we go into thursday night underneath increasingly clear skies. minus three degrees in edinburgh, much colder than that though in the countryside. friday, there could be an odd patch of cloud still left over across the southwest, bringing an odd spot of rain. but for the vast majority of the uk, it's dry day with long spells of sunshine. that said, there still will be a few showers around across northern scotland, and a few of these will sneak down to affect some of the eastern coasts of england as well. it's going to feel cold. temperatures a—8 degrees celsius.
9:57 pm
now, heading into the weekend, for most of us, high—pressure will continue to bring fine and sunny conditions. cold, mind you. in the south though, we've got this troublesome area of low pressure. there is some uncertainty about how far north the band of rain is going to get. the rain could stay across into northern france and keep us dry, but it could go far north as wales, the midlands, and east anglia. at the moment, the best guess is between these two solutions, where we see the rain mainly affecting southern counties of england. for most of the uk though, away from that band of rain, it's another dry, sunny, cold day, with againjust a scattering of showers around across northern and some northeastern areas. by sunday, the low pressure has moved well away from the uk, in towards the mediterranean, and high—pressure really is beginning to dominate. it's not completely dry everywhere, there still will be some showers around, particularly across northern scotland. wintry at times, may be for the northern isles, certainly over the high ground in scotland. there could be a few mist and fog patches to start the day elsewhere, but for the majority, much less rain than we've seen over
9:58 pm
recent days and weeks. mostly dry with sunshine, but feeling cold. temperatures a—7 degrees celsius. now, this autumn, the jet stream pattern has often looked like this, with a big ridge to the west of the uk. we found ourselves underneath a trough, which has encouraged slow—moving areas of low pressure to develop, and day after day, after day of torrential rain, for some it's been the wettest autumn on record. but the jet stream pattern is changing significantly, the wave lengths are changing. we have a really big area of high pressure in the upper atmosphere, this big ridge to the west of the uk that builds a big area of high pressure down at the earth's surface, and that's going to be moving over the uk early next week, which will encourage a lot of dry weather and sunshine as well. but later in the week, that slips away southwards, and we could see some further changes. so, next week, it is a much drier spell of weather, there will be some showers around at times, but spells of sunshine, it stays cold. later in the week, we may see the winds of strengthen, rain moving into northwestern areas, but that's more typical where we'd expect to see rain
9:59 pm
as we head into winter, and is less likely to cause significant impacts. that's your weather.
10:00 pm
tonight at ten — the future of the nhs — in a post—brexit world — dominates the day's election campaigning. labour claims it has proof that the nhs is at risk — in an american trade deal — after britain leaves the eu. we've now got evidence that under borisjohnson the nhs is on the table and will be up for sale. but borisjohnson says the conservative manifesto promises the nhs will not be on the table in post—brexit trade talks. we are absolutely resolved that there will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation, the nhs is not on the table in any way. we'll have the latest from the campaign trail, with two weeks to polling day. also tonight...

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on